Category Archives: Publications

New Publication: Osteoarchaeology in Historical Context

Osteoarchaeology in Historical Context: Cemetery Research from the Low Countries Edited by Roos van Oosten, Rachel Schats & Kerry Fast Osteoarchaeology is a rich field for reconstructing past lives in that it can provide details on sex, age-at-death, stature, and … Continue reading

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New Article by Guy Geltner: “The Path to Pistoia: Urban Hygiene Before the Black Death”

Abstract: When the Black Death struck Western Europe in late 1347, city dwellers across the region were already practising public health, in part by building, maintaining and monitoring infrastructures whose prophylactic value emerged from the experience of intensified urbanization. The … Continue reading

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“Roads to Health” – Now Available from Penn Press

Roads to Health: Infrastructure and Urban Wellbeing in Later Medieval Italy G. Geltner 320 pages | 6 x 9 | 20 illus. 
Cloth Aug 2019 | ISBN 9780812251357 A volume in the Middle Ages Series “G. Geltner’s Roads to Health … Continue reading

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Forthcoming: “Policing the Urban Environment in Premodern Europe” Edited by Claire Weeda & Carole Rawcliffe

Tapping into a combination of court documents, urban statutes, material artefacts, health guides and treatises, Policing the Urban Environment in Premodern Europe offers a unique perspective on how premodern public authorities tried to create a clean, healthy environment. Overturning many … Continue reading

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New Article by Guy Geltner: “In the Camp and on the March: Military Manuals as Sources for Studying Premodern Public Health”

Abstract: Historians tend to view public health as a quintessentially modern phenomenon, enabled by the emergence of representative democracies, centralised bureaucracies and advanced biomedicine. While social, urban and religious historians have begun chipping away at the entrenched dichotomy between pre/modernity … Continue reading

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New Article by Guy Geltner: “In the Camp and on the March: Military Manuals as Sources for Studying Premodern Public Health”

Abstract: Historians tend to view public health as a quintessentially modern phenomenon, enabled by the emergence of representative democracies, centralized bureaucracies and advanced biomedicine. While social, urban and religious historians have begun chipping away at the entrenched dichotomy between pre/modernity … Continue reading

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New Publication by Claire Weeda: ‘Reviewing Conduct Books: Galenic Medicine and the “Civilising Process” in Western European Households c.1100–1300’

C. Weeda, ‘Reviewing Conduct Books: Galenic Medicine and the “Civilising Process” in Western European Households c.1100–1300’, in Christopher M. Woolgar (ed.), The Elite Household in England, 1100-1550: Proceedings of the 2016 Harlaxton Symposium (Donington, 2018), 167-184. Abstract: In western Europe conduct books … Continue reading

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New Book by Guy Geltner – Roads to Health: Infrastructure and Public Wellbeing in Later Medieval Italy

Guy Geltner’s new book “Roads to Health: Infrastructure and Public Wellbeing in Later Medieval Italy” is in the process of being published by The University of Pennsylvania Press. This book “[…] proposes to examine public health from an emic (“insider”) perspective as … Continue reading

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New Article by Janna Coomans: “The king of dirt: public health and sanitation in late medieval Ghent”

Abstract: Taking the office of the coninc der ribauden in Ghent as a case-study, this article reconstructs the enforcement of urban sanitation and preventative health practices during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The coninc managed a wide range of issues perceived as potentially polluting, … Continue reading

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